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IGC[1]

Professor Prakash discusses the results of his and Karthik Muralidharan’s IGC project involving providing free bikes to girls in rural Bihar.

Watch the discussion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4bJtCWnL2I

The above video is also featured on the Mankiw blog, as well as the homepage of the IGC.

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Archita Banik defended her dissertation on Monday, July 22nd 2013. Her dissertation entitled “Three Essays on Health Economics” was completed under the supervision of her major advisor Dennis Heffley and associate advisors Thomas Miceli and Nishith Prakash.

Archita’s dissertation analyzes an incentive-based health insurance plan in the context of developing countries and also examines the importance of different socioeconomic factors and presence of microcredit in determining ever-married women’s health in the context of India. The first essay of her dissertation is a theoretical analysis where she analyzes an individual’s behavior with misperceived health risk under incentive-based health insurance plan vs. a conventional plan. The other two essays are empirical studies in the context of India where she shows that age, education, marital status, and presence of microcredit are important factors in determining ever-married women’s health in India.

Archita is heading to Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, where she will join as a tenure-track assistant professor of economics starting from Fall.

Congratulations, Archita!

t_prakash[1]Two of Professor Nishith Prakash‘s works have been cited recently in the media.

His work with Aimee Chin concerning affirmative action in India was cited in The Economist.

A paper he collaborated on with Chin and Mehtabul Azam was cited by Business Standard.

Professor Prakash is currently in India collecting data for his Affirmative Action project. Later this month he will be in the state of Bihar holding meetings with government officials and school authorities for a new project focused on reducing gaps in learning outcomes across different caste groups.

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